Book Review: Evidence That Demands a Verdict, by Josh McDowell and Sean McDowell

I recently finished reading the book Evidence That Demands a Verdict: Life-Changing Truth
for a Skeptical World
by Josh McDowell and Sean McDowell. I've known of
the book for years, and had someone recommend it to me years ago, but kept
putting off reading it. Now that I'm writing a blog, I need to research the
questions I have. This seemed like a good time to read a classic book on
Christian Apologetics.

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How do I Rejoice, Pray and Give Thanks at All Times?

Rejoice always, pray
without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God
in Christ Jesus for you. (1
Thessalonians 5:16-18 ESV)

These verses aren't
easy to follow. It's easy to think "The
apostle Paul didn't know what I would be going through when he wrote
that!"
No, he didn't, but God knew what you'd be going through...

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Were Jesus’ Followers Uneducated?

Bart Ehrman, an atheist scholar, argues: "Jesus’s disciples were lower-class, illiterate peasants from remote rural areas of Galilee, where very few people could read, let alone write, and let alone create full-scale compositions." Some skeptics expand on the argument: Because Jesus' followers were lower-class, illiterate peasants, no educated person would believe the claims of Jesus, and therefore Christianity isn't true.

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What are the Hezekiah and Isaiah Bullae?

In archaeology, a bulla (plural bullae)
is a clay seal used when documents or goods were transferred from one person to
another. The sender would put a small piece of wet clay over where the item
would be opened, then press in a signet to seal the item and ensure it's
authenticity. An unbroken seal would let the recipient know the item wasn't
tampered with. A more modern equivalent would be a wax seal on a formal letter
or invitation.

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What Types of Questions will be on this Blog? Part 2

If you haven't read What Types of Questions will be on this Blog? Part 1, you may want to start there. I had intended to list some of the topics I want to research in that post, but the post started getting a bit too long, so I decided to split it into two parts. Actually, since I'm trying to figure out how I'm going to write one post a week, splitting the long post into two shorter ones seemed like a good idea; now I have one less to write. 

The list of questions I've written...

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What Types of Questions will be on this Blog? Part 1

The first article post I ever posted was titled Domain Registered, since I had just registered the domain BibleQuestions.info. In it, I have some examples of the types of questions I want to research, and my motivations for deciding to use a blog format to keep track of my research.

My second blog post I titled What is Apologetics?, and I discussed why Christians should be able to talk about their...

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Should Christians Celebrate Christmas?

I had originally planned on writing an article titled "How did December 25th Become Christmas?", but I found wildly conflicting information. The Bible doesn't indicate when Jesus was born, so there are many different opinions on how that date was chosen. Rather than possibly give incorrect information, I thought I'd ask a more fundamental question: Should Christians celebrate Christmas?

Some people may be...

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Could the Gospel Message have been Accurately Transmitted Orally?

Pastor and theologian Rainer Riesner concludes in his doctoral dissertation Jesus as a Teacher the disciples could have received Jesus's teachings orally, and passed those lessons on to others without corrupting the message.

  1. Jesus spoke with authority to command respect and concern to safeguard his teachings.
  2. Jesus's claim to be the ...
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Were the Gospels Transmitted like the “Telephone” Game?

In the "Telephone" game, people start by sitting in a circle. One person makes up a sentence and whispers it into the next person's ear, and the second  person whispers what was heard into the third person's ear, and so on. This process continues until the last person says the sentence out loud, and the person who started the game says the original sentence out loud. Usually the sentence get changed during the game, and the starting sentence and ending sentence...

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